Simple Tooth Extractions

 
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Tooth Extractions Rutherford, NJ - Frost Dental Group


While dental extractions are not something every dental patient needs, they are a vital part of dentistry. Without tooth extractions, decay-causing bacteria can spread to surrounding teeth, potentially damaging and weakening them. In some instances, this bacterium can even spread to other body parts, negatively affecting whole-body health. To care for your overall health, Dr. Lee Frost offers Rutherford dental extractions, including wisdom teeth extractions.

Dr. Frost has been offering quality dental care, including dental extractions, to the Rutherford area for nearly 30 years. In 2008, he welcomed board-certified anesthesiologist Glen Atlas, M.D., who offers his services at Frost Dental Group. For patients who may experience any type of anxiety during an extraction, Dr. Atlas offers IV sedation to help these patients relax and feel more comfortable.

How Are Tooth Extractions Planned?

Dr. Frost's Rutherford dental office is very modern and uses the latest technology to plan the safest and most comfortable dental extraction possible. This technology includes a digital X-ray machine that displays X-ray images onto a computer, where Dr. Frost can zoom in on the tooth's root and other areas to formulate the most conservative approach to your dental treatment.

If you are experiencing problems with the emergence of wisdom teeth, Dr. Frost can also use this digital imaging technology to view how the wisdom teeth are developing and impacting your surrounding teeth.

How Do I Know If I Need a Dental Extraction?

Dr. Frost may perform a tooth extraction for a number of reasons, from preventive to protective. Dr. Frost may recommend dental extractions for any of the following reasons:

  • Extensive decay, to the extent that root canal will not correct the issue
  • Infected or impacted wisdom that are putting pressure on other teeth or causing decay in other teeth
  • Preventing or reversing crowded teeth
  • Removing a tooth affected by gum disease
  • For orthodontic reasons

While Dr. Frost will take every measure possible to save a tooth, sometimes a dental extraction is the best option for protecting your overall health.

What Restorative Options Are Available After Extraction?

If the dental extraction was unrelated to wisdom teeth or overcrowding, Dr. Frost offers a number of options for tooth replacement after an extraction from his Rutherford dental office. Once the gums have time to heal following the tooth removal procedure, Dr. Frost can use either a fixed dental bridge or a dental implant to restore your smile. A fixed bridge replaces an extracted tooth by installing crowns over the surrounding teeth that anchor a replacement tooth or "pontic." Alternately, a dental implant involves surgically implanting a titanium tooth root and covering it with a dental crown. Both fixed bridges and dental implants are permanent solutions to tooth replacement following an extraction.

Dr. Frost is happy to discuss your replacement options to determine the best choice for you.

How Can I Care For My Gums Following an Extraction?

Dr. Frost will provide you with post-procedure instructions for caring for your teeth after a tooth extraction. This care regimen typically includes taking pain-relieving medications.  You may also want to eat soft food diet after the procedure to be sure that gum tissue is allowed to heal. In a few days, any discomfort you may be experiencing should subside.

For more information about tooth extractions in Rutherford, contact Frost Dental Group to make an appointment.

 

Reasons for a tooth extraction

There are numerous situations in which a simple extraction can help alleviate pain or prepare you for another cosmetic or restorative procedure.  Some common reasons for extraction include:

  • Advanced periodontal disease that has loosened the tooth roots
  • Extra teeth or baby teeth that impede adult teeth
  • Preparing a patient for orthodontic treatment
  • Removing a fractured or malformed tooth
  • Severe tooth decay which cannot be remedied with root canal therapy

How is a tooth extracted?

As a precaution, the dentist will first take X-rays of the tooth or teeth in question, to help plan the procedure.  After preparing a method of extraction, you will be given a local anesthetic that will prevent you from feeling pain during the procedure.  Next, the dentist will use a tool called an elevator to lift the tooth and loosen ligaments and gum tissue around the base of the tooth.  Finally, the dentist will use a pair of forceps, to gently rock the tooth back and forth until it breaks free of the ligaments holding it in the gum tissue.  Occasionally, a stubborn tooth will resist the dentist’s soft tug, refusing to come out.  In these and more complex cases, the tooth may need to be broken up into smaller pieces for removal. 

Once removed, we will pack gauze into the socket and have you place pressure on the area by biting down.  If necessary, the dentist will place stitches to close the socket.

If you are sick the week prior to your scheduled extraction or on the day of, please contact our office, as alternative arrangements may need to be made.  Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Wisdom Tooth Extractions

Third molars, commonly referred to as wisdom teeth, are usually the last four of 32 teeth to erupt (surface) in the mouth, generally making their appearance between the ages of 17 to 25. They are located at the back of the mouth (top and bottom), near the entrance to the throat. The term “wisdom” stems from the idea that the molars surface at a time typically associated with increased maturity or “wisdom”.

In most cases, inadequate space in the mouth does not allow the wisdom teeth to erupt properly and become fully functional. When this happens, the tooth can become impacted (stuck) in an undesirable or potentially harmful position. If left untreated, impacted wisdom teeth can contribute to infection, damage to other teeth, and possibly cysts or tumors.

There are several types, or degrees, of impaction based on the actual depth of the teeth within the jaw:

Soft Tissue Impaction: The upper portion of the tooth (the crown) has penetrated through the bone, but the gingiva (gum) is covering part or all of the tooth’s crown and has not positioned properly around the tooth. Because it is difficult to keep the area clean, food can become trapped below the gum and cause an infection and/or tooth decay, resulting in pain and swelling.

Partial Bony Impaction: The tooth has partially erupted, but a portion of the crown remains submerged below the gum and surrounding jawbone. Again, because it is difficult to keep the area clean, infection will commonly occur.

Complete Bony Impaction: The tooth is completely encased by jawbone. This will require more complex removal techniques.

Reasons to remove wisdom teeth

While not all wisdom teeth require removal, wisdom teeth extractions are most often performed because of an active problem such as pain, swelling, decay or infection, or as a preventative measure to avoid serious problems in the future. If impaction of one or more wisdom teeth is present, and left untreated, a number of potentially harmful outcomes can occur, including:

  • Damage to nearby teeth: Second molars (the teeth directly in front of the wisdom teeth) can be adversely affected by impacted wisdom teeth, resulting in tooth decay (cavities), periodontal disease (gum disease) and possible bone loss.
  • Disease: Although uncommon, cysts and tumors can occur in the areas surrounding impacted wisdom teeth.
  • Infection: Bacteria and food can become trapped under the gum tissue, resulting in an infection. The infection can cause considerable pain and danger.
  • Tooth Crowding: It has been theorized that impacted wisdom teeth can put pressure on other teeth and cause them to become misaligned (crowded or twisted). This theory isn’t universally accepted by all dental professionals, and it has never been validated by any scientific studies.

Wisdom teeth examination

As with any dental procedure, your dentist will want to initially conduct a thorough examination of the wisdom and surrounding teeth. Panoramic or digital X-rays will be taken in order for your dentist to evaluate the position of the wisdom teeth and determine if a current problem exists, or the likelihood of any potential future problems.  The X-rays can also expose additional risk factors, such as deterioration or decay of nearby teeth. Early evaluation and treatment (typically in the mid-teen years) is recommended in order to identify potential problems and to improve the results for patients requiring wisdom teeth extractions. Only after a thorough examination can your dentist provide you with the best options for your particular case.

What does the removal of wisdom teeth involve?

Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, generally performed under local anesthesia, intravenous (IV) sedation, or general anesthesia by a specially trained dentist in an office surgery suite. The surgery does not require an overnight stay, and you will be released with post-operative instructions and medication (if necessary), to help manage any swelling or discomfort.

After Tooth Extractions

There are a number of reasons that your dentist might recommend a tooth extraction. Some dental patients suffer from tooth decay; others need to remove teeth hindering orthodontic treatment, whereas various patients simply need wisdom teeth removal. While a tooth extraction can be a serious dental procedure, aftercare is just as critical as the procedure itself. As the dental patient, it is important to understand that pain and the risk of infection can be lessened with proper care.

Care immediately following surgery:

  • Keep pressure on the gauze pad that your doctor placed over the surgical area by gently biting down. Dampen the gauze sponge with water if it begins to dry out. Try to maintain constant pressure in intervals of 45-60 minutes, repeating as often as needed, or until bleeding lessens.  Change the gauze as needed. 
  • Keep your head elevated and try to lower your activity level as much as possible.
  • 48 hours after surgery, rinse mouth with warm salt water every 1-2 hours. Avoid using any mouthwash containing alcohol as it can irritate the wound.
  • Keep your mouth clean by brushing areas around the surgical site, but be sure to avoid sutures. Touching the wounded area in any fashion should be prevented.
  • Use ice packs to control swelling by placing them on facial areas near extraction.
  • Take all prescribed medications accordingly. If any itching or swelling occurs, contact the practice immediately, or go to the nearest emergency room.
  • Try to eat softer foods, preferably high in protein.
  • Keep your body hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids, but do not drink through a straw for the next 5-7 days.
  • If you are a regular tobacco user refrain from smoking for the next 3-4 days as smoking increases your chances of getting a dry socket as well as an infection.

After your tooth has been extracted, healing will take some time. Within 3 to 14 days, your sutures should fall out or dissolve. For sutures that are non-resorbable, your doctor will schedule a follow-up appointment to remove the stitches for you. Your tooth’s empty socket will gradually fill in with bone over time and smooth over with adjacent tissues.

Possible complications after a tooth extraction

Bleeding – Bleeding after a tooth extraction is entirely normal. A pinkish tinted saliva and subtle oozing is fairly common during the first 36 hours. If bleeding gets excessive, control it by using dampened gauze pads and biting down to keep pressure on the area. As an alternative to gauze pads, a moistened tea bag can be used, as the tannic acid helps blood vessels contract. Apply pressure to the gauze or tea bag by gently biting down for 30 minutes. Please remember that raised tempers, sitting upright, and exercise can all increase blood flow to the head, which can cause excess bleeding. Try to avoid these as much as possible. If your bleeding does not reduce after 48 hours, please call the practice.

Bone sequestra (dead tooth fragments) – Some patients have small sharp tooth fragments that were unable to be completely removed during surgery. During the recovery period, these dead bone fragments, or bone sequestra, slowly work themselves through the gums as a natural healing process. This can be a little painful until the sequestra are removed so please call our practice immediately if you notice any sharp fragments poking through the surgery site.

Dry socket – In the days that follow your tooth extraction, pain should gradually subside. Rarely, patients report that pain increases to a throbbing unbearable pain that shoots up towards the ear. Often this is a case of dry socket. Dry socket occurs when the blood clot becomes irritated and ousted before healing is complete. Food and debris can then get into the socket causing irritation. Tobacco users and women taking oral contraceptives are at a higher risk of getting dry socket. Dry socket is not an infection but does require a visit to our office. If you think you may be suffering from dry socket, please contact the practice immediately.

Lightheadedness - Because you may have been fasting prior to surgery, your blood sugar levels may be lower than normal. Until your body has had the chance to catch up and process some sugars, you should remember to stand up slowly when getting up from a relaxed position. For somewhat immediate relief, try eating something soft and sugary, stay in a relaxed position, and reduce the elevation of your head.

Numbness – Many patients report still feeling numb hours after their tooth extraction procedure. An extended lack of feeling around the mouth is normal and can last 10-12 hours after surgery.

Swelling – Swelling should subside almost entirely within 10 days after surgery. Immediately following your tooth extraction, apply an ice pack to the facial areas near the extraction. Continue using the ice in 15 minute intervals for the first 36 hours. After 36 hours, ice will no longer be beneficial in reducing swelling and moist heat should be used instead. To decrease swelling, apply a warm damp cloth to the sides of your face.

Trismus (difficulty opening and closing mouth) – If you experience a sore jaw and difficulty chewing or swallowing, do not be alarmed. Occasionally patients’ chewing muscles and jaw joints remain sore 3-5 days after surgery. This soreness can also make it difficult to open and close your mouth. Soreness should eventually subside.

If you have any worries, or are experiencing any complications not mentioned, please contact our practice immediately so that we may address your concerns.

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